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The Statewide Impact of Burn Foundations on Burn Survivors and Burn Prevention Education

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The Statewide Impact of Burn Foundations on Burn Survivors and Burn Prevention Education

Control/Tracking Number: 16-A-88-ABA
Activity: Abstract Submission
Current Date/Time: 9/24/2015 2:17:50 PM

Author Block: J. Radics-Johnson, MBA
Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation, Burbank, CA

Abstract:
Introduction: Burn Foundations historically were established to support local burn centers. Today, burn
foundations are often independent nonprofit organizations that provide direct services to burn survivors
and burn prevention education services. With nearly 39 burn foundations throughout the U.S., one state is
headquarters to 11 burn foundations, 28% of all burn foundations in the nation. A statewide survey was
conducted to assess the 11 burn foundations throughout the state.

Methods: In January 2015, Directors of 11 burn foundations throughout the state were invited to
participate in a 31-question online survey to assess their organization’s staff and budget size, programs
and services, fundraising efforts and other organizational information. Questions of the survey included:
Organization Name, Number of Staff Members, Budget Size, Types of Burn Survivor and Burn Prevention
Education Programs Offered, Types of Collaborations, etc.

Results: Of the 11 burn foundations invited to participate in the survey, 91% (n=10/11) responded. The
average number of years of operation for each burn foundation was 25.4 years (range 7-44 years) and
the average number of full time paid employees (FTE) was 2.4 FTE. A third of the burn foundations
(33.3%; n=3/9) had an annual budget size of $100,000-$250,000. Nearly all of the burn foundations
conducted a Burn Camp (87.5%; n=7/8) as well as Support Groups and Financial Assistance and
Scholarships (75%; n=6/8). More than half of the burn foundations provided burn prevention education for
Ages 0-5, Grades K-5 and Adults, as well as a Youth Fire Setting Program (n=4/7). Nearly all of the burn
foundations (87.5%; n=7/8) have partnerships with burn centers and fire departments, whereas only
37.5% have partnerships with other burn foundations (n=3/8). Many of the burn foundations provided
Burn Center Funding (71.4%; n=5/7) and 67% of the burn foundations believed more support was needed
for burn survivors (n=4/6). Also 80% of the burn foundations believed more communication is needed
among the burn foundations throughout the state (n=4/5).

Conclusions: With limited resources, Burn Foundations need to work together to reduce duplication of
services. More communication is needed among Burn Foundations nationwide to ensure the best
possible care is provided to burn survivors and that burn prevention education is reaching as many
individuals as possible.

Applicability of Research to Practice: Burn Foundations can serve as a valuable resource to burn
centers and burn patients. Through partnerships with local Burn Foundations, burn centers may be able
to increase burn patient supportive services